KO.VIDi-TO.ZNA 19.20.21.?

translated in English: WHO.SEES-IT.KNOWS.

drawing-collage digitally processed. animation

Duration: 2min. played in a loop

Two versions: Vertical 9:16 and horizontal 4:3 projection

Wall projection&speakers or monitor&headphones

Year: 2021

Sound: CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication

Exhibition: THE STATE OF EMERGENCY -  

The 90th Autumn Exhibition of ULUS Art Pavilion "Cvijeta Zuzorić", Belgrade 18.November-16.December 2021

Curation Art Council of ULUS, in cooperation with art historians Dr Dejan Sretenović and Dr Jelena Stojanović

 This piece alludes to the workings of our bilateral negotiation between data footprints and an identity matrix powered through mis/information around transmission and processing. The power dynamics that fuel this process are highlighted in the way partial animation feeds into still images to create the illusion of what and who comes into being. Surprisingly perhaps, in an age of information overload, there is a growing ambiguity around the participants involved, which the pandemic, with its global outreach equal to that of the internet, has highlighted even further.  Ko -Vid (who sees in Serbian) is symbolic of the anonymous eye in the ‘cloud’ that tracks, traces and constructs selfhoods with unknowable futures.

Dr Frosoulla Kofterou

Ovaj deo aludira na funkcionisanje naših bilateralnih pregovora između otisaka podataka i matrice identiteta zasnovane na pogrešnim/informacijama oko prenosa i obrade. Dinamika snage koja podstiče ovaj proces je istaknuta u načinu na koji se delimična animacija unosi u nepokretne slike kako bi se stvorila iluzija šta i ko ulazi u biće.

Možda iznenađujuće, u doba preopterećenosti informacijama, postoji sve veća nejasnoća oko uključenih učesnika, što je pandemija, sa svojim globalnim dosegom jednakim Internetu, još više istakla. Ko-Vid (koji vidi na srpskom) je simbol anonimnog oka u „oblaku“ koji prati, traga i konstruiše sopstva sa nespoznatljivom budućnošću.

Dr Frosoulla Kofterou

 

"There is an old adage that crisis brings both danger and opportunity. During the Covid-19 pandemic, this has proved true for many politicians.

As the coronavirus has spread, many governments around the world have sought to tackle the pandemic by broadening their powers and abilities, according to data collated from the Covid-19 Digital Rights Tracker and Civic Freedom Tracker...

 To monitor rule-breakers, 22 countries have used surveillance drones. Facial recognition programmes have been expanded, internet censorship has occurred in 28 countries, and internet shutdowns in 13. At least 120 contact-tracing apps are in use across 71 states, and 60 other digital contact-tracing measures have been used across 38 countries.

Many of these are examples of emergency powers: exceptional actions that states can invoke during a crisis to deviate away from existing laws. Legally, emergency powers vary by country. Many are enshrined under a constitution, give specific powers to the executive, and require time limits. Many (but not all) require the declaration of a "state of emergency"..." 

 Text by Luke Kemp 28th April 2021. The 'Stomp Reflex': When governments abuse emergency powers, BBC Future [online] Available at: <https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20210427-the-stomp-reflex-when-governments-abuse-emergency-powers > [Accessed 21 November 2021].  

Links for further reading